• We’re more popular: Backpackers knew it for years, but studies confirm the Maple Leaf really is beloved around the world. In 2012, the Canada brand held top spotin the Reputation Institute’s ranking of countries based on people’s trust, admiration and affinity for them. America’s reputation rank: 23rd.
  • Our taste in chocolate is better: Everyone knows we have loads of chocolate candy varieties you can’t get in the U.S.—Coffee Crisp, Aero, Smarties—but earlier this year Hershey’s said it re-engineered its chocolate recipe to better appeal to Canadian palates. A Hershey’s spokesperson saidCanadians prefer smoother and sweeter chocolate compared to the “grittier or even cheesier flavour” chocolate found in America.
  • Our national symbol is a worthier animal: Yes, eagles soar high, have incredible eyesight and razor-sharp talons. They’re also carrion-eating louts. As Ben Franklin once noted, “I wish the Bald Eagle had not been chosen the Representative of our Country. He is a Bird of bad moral Character. He does not get his Living honestly . . . like those among Men who live by Sharping & Robbing he is generally poor and often very lousy . . . a rank Coward.” The beaver, on the other hand, is a rugged, humble and industrious little creature (okay, rodent).
  • Roadside wonderland: Canada has more than 1,200 roadside attractions. The U.S. may have more in sheer numbers, but nothing compares to our giant duck, pierogi, sausage, Easter egg, hockey stick, moose, apple, dinosaur, nickel or lobster.
  • Our Canadian bacon is better than their Canadian bacon: This can get confusing, but try to follow along. When Americans buy “Canadian bacon,” they get a package of fully-cooked processed slices of ham, which Canadians don’t actually eat. Canadian bacon, on the other hand, isn’t called that by Canadians. Instead it’s pea meal bacon, a Toronto creation of pickle-brine-cured pork loin rolled in cornmeal. It’s a travesty most Americans can’t tell the difference.
  • Giant American corporations associate with our unofficial mascot: Up to 80 per cent of the world’s polar bears are in Canada—Americans have to make do with polar bears in Coke commercials and on pop cans.
  • Our lobsters taste better: It’s an endless debate between fishermen and chefs in the Maritime provinces and Maine. We claim the cooler waters of Canada spawn tastier crustaceans. Americans disagree. But most Maine lobster is processed in Canada anyway, so we dominate both ways.
  • Better sea monsters: Both Ogopogo and the lesser-known monster in Lake Champlain have been captured on video in recent years. The U.S.’s most famous sea monster, Jaws, isn’t even real.
  • We’re record-setters: For our population size, no other country breaks more Guinness World Records.
  • Our national anthem is better: Musicologists in Britain analyzed eight anthems to see which drew listeners to join in most—O Canada ranked 5th ahead of the Star-Spangled Banner (6th)