• We don’t have out-of-control prison sentences: Last year 38,700 people were serving time in Canada, roughly 114 for every 100,000 citizens. That’s nothing. In the U.S. 2.24 million Americans are locked up—716 for every 100,000 citizens, the highest incarceration rate in the world. Canada ranks 136th.
  • Our government doesn’t kill people: Canada officially abolished capital punishment in 1976, but no Canadian inmate has been executed since 1962. By contrast, the U.S. put 43 prisoners to deathlast year alone, while 3,125 inmates continue to wait on death row.
  • Our judges are appointed, not elected: While some believe Canadian judges should be picked directly by citizens, as is common in American courts, the idea has largely been written off as inconsistent with the Constitution, which could be for the best. Studies showjudges have difficulty being impartial on the bench, when, as candidates, they rely heavily on donors and special interest groups for support. As well, a study showed judges increase their sentences when facing re-election. In fact, electoral zealousness added six per cent to overall prison time for aggravated assault, rape and robbery sentences. That helps explain America’s crowded prisons.
  • We’re more relaxed about pot: In both countries, support for legalizing marijuana is at all-time highs. In 2012, 66 per cent of Canadians supported legalization or decriminalization, compared to half of Americans.
  • Mass shootings here are rare: Since 1982 in the U.S. there have been at least 45 shootings in which at least six people were killed. In total, 434 people were murdered in those incidents, and another 384 injured. During that time, there were two such events in Canada—the bodies of eight Bandidos gang members were discovered in an Ontario farmer’s field in 2006, while in 1989, 14 women were gunned down at the École Polytechnique.
  • We have far fewer murders: Our homicide rate is 1.73 per 100,000 people, compared to 4.7 in the U.S.
  • Our roads are safer: The number of fatalities from traffic accidents in Canada is 8.8 for every 100,000 people, compared to 13.9 in the U.S.
  • Our youth are safer: America has the highest mortality rate for young people ages 10 to 24 among developed countries, with a death rate of 60 per 100,000of the population, compared to less than 40 in Canada.
  • We’re less likely to get robbed: Canada’s robbery rate is 86 per 100,000, far below America’s rate of 114.