• We’re more peaceful.  This year, Canada was ranked the eighth most peaceful country in the world.  The US is ranked 100th.
  • Our election turnout is more fair: While voter turnout may be higher in the United States, it’s much more equitable in Canada, with broad social inclusion of both high-income and low-income voters. In Canada, voter turnout for the richest 20 per centof the population is roughly 63 per cent, whereas the participation rate of the bottom 20 per cent is only slightly less, at 60 per cent. In the States, roughly 79 per cent of the wealthiest voters turn out to cast ballots, compared to just slightly more than half of the poorest voters.
  • Federally, our politicians are (slightly) more representative of the gender divide: Federally, women make up 24.7 per cent of Parliament, compared to the U.S. Congress where women account for just 17.8 per cent of representatives.
  • Provincially, our leaders are (much) more representative of the gender divide: The governments of Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, Alberta, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Nunavut are all led by females who are responsible for governing more than 87 per cent of Canada’s population. By comparison, America has just five female governors, and the vast majority of Americans live in male-governed states.
  • We have far fewer assassinations: Since Confederation, only three Canadian politicians have been assassinated, including two Fathers of Confederation: Thomas D’Arcy McGee was shot by a Fenian sympathizer in 1868; George Brown was shot in the leg by a former Globe employee in 1880 (the wound led to a fatal infection). Quebec minister of labour Pierre Laporte was kidnapped and assassinated by the FLQ in 1970. In the United States, a staggering 44 politicians have been assassinated, including four sitting presidents.
  • We’re fine with gay politicians: While former New Jersey governor Jim McGreevey might be called the first (and only) “openly gay” governor in American history, it doesn’t really count if you resign as soon as you come out of the closet. In Canada, not only is Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynneopenly gay, but her sexual orientation barely factors into coverage of Ontario politics. With all the scandals to beset Queen’s Park, the premier’s personal life is the least shocking thing about Ontario’s government.
  • We attract more immigrants: Canada gets 5.65 per 1,000 people, compared to the U.S., with 3.64 per 1,000.
  • We have fewer lobbyists: We’ve seen an explosion in lobbying, but in Canada the ratio of lobbyists to senators and MPs is still 12 to 1, while in the U.S. the ratio of lobbyists to members of Congress is 23 to 1. Some estimate the U.S. ratio is as high as 65 to 1 since many lobbyists don’t register.
  • We mandate a time for holding the government’s feet to the fire: Sure, question period has degenerated in recent years, but nothing like it exists in the U.S. political system.
  • You don’t have to be rich to run for the highest office in the land: U.S. presidential elections cost an estimated $7 billion to mount, while Canada’s top five parties were allowed to spend a combined $90 million, thanks to Elections Canada spending limits.