• Canada has earned a poor reputation when it comes to fighting climate change, but if you believe the globe is about to undergo a catastrophic shift in weather patterns, Canada is the best place to ride it out. UCLA geographer Laurence Smith has argued that by 2050 warming will unlock vast new resources and transform Canada into an economic superpower.
  • Carp-eh diem: We do not yet have to contend with the dreaded Asian carp, a species of fish that has invaded U.S. waterways, killing off competing species wherever it goes. The fish are big—up to 40 kg—and they’re crazy, literally throwing themselves into passing boats. Natural resources officials believe we’ve so far avoided the onslaught, but really, if this mini-monster reaches the Great Lakes, our rivers are doomed.
  • Less spin: Americans mock our weather, but come late spring, we can only look south with pity. We average just 60 reportsof actual tornadoes per year compared with the 1,200confirmed tornado strikes in the U.S., the most of any country in the world. Only five per cent of our storms reach the EF-3 category of intensity, the level where winds of more than 220 km/h start tearing up buildings and trees. The U.S. gets about 37 such tornadoes annually, costing the country 80 lives.
  • We help them repopulate their endangered species: When the U.S. wants to help an animal species come back from the brink, they call on Canada. In 1995, dozens of grey wolves were captured in Alberta and shipped south to be let free in Yellowstone National Park, 72 years after the park’s last wolf den was destroyed under a federal extermination plan. Next year Alaska will reintroduce wood bison, North America’s largest living land mammals, into the wilderness. The animals come from a captive herd started with Canadian animals.
  • Niagara Falls: Canada’s horseshoe falls vs. the American side. Enough said.
  • Water, water everywhere: With less than half a per cent of the world’s population, we have seven per cent of its renewable water supply—the most per inhabitant of any developed country. The supply for an average American is just 11 per cent of what’s available to us.
  • We have more beautiful coast to enjoy: 243,000 km of shoreline compared to 153,000 km in the U.S.
  • According to the OECD Better Life Index, our air is cleaner (16 micrograms of particulate matter per cubic metre here compared to 18 in the U.S.)
  •  . . . so too is our water (89 per cent of Canadians report being satisfied with the quality of local water, versus 87 per cent in the U.S.).