• Canada has greater economic freedom: So says the U.S.-based Heritage Foundation Index of Economic Freedom. Canada scores 6th place, while America comes in 10th. Credit our sounder public finances.
  • We have less income disparity: While the gap between rich and poor has become more marked in both countries, it’s more like a canyon in the U.S. Between 1966 and 2011, the average inflation-adjusted income of the bottom 90 per cent of American workers grew by a negligible $59. Meanwhile, the income of the top 10 per cent of workers soared by $116,071. Among OECD countries ranked for worst income disparity, the U.S takes fourth place, behind only Chile, Mexico and Turkey. Canada comes in 12th out of 34 nations.
  • Our young workers are doing better: Yes, Canada has a lower unemployment rate than the U.S., but while the overall gap is narrowing, young workers here are more likely to find work. Canada’s youth unemployment rate is 13.5 per cent, compared to 16.8 per cent in the States.
  • Our banks are better: Earlier this year Bloomberg ranked the world’s strongest banks. Four of the top 10 were Canadian, and all scored higher than the top U.S. bank, Citigroup, which came in 9th.
  • We have more social mobility: If you want to live the American Dream, move to Canada. Social mobility, measured by intergenerational changes in income between sons and their fathers, is twice as high in Canada as in the U.S. In other words, a son born to a poor father in the U.S. is twice as likely to remain poor throughout his life than had he been born in Canada.
  • The money in your wallet is safer: Canadian currency once had a terrible reputation for being easy to counterfeit, but new polymer bills introduced by the Bank of Canada have hi-tech features that make them almost impossible to reproduce. Of the 500 million notes circulated since 2011, only 56 fakeshave been seized. In the U.S., out of every one million bank notes in circulation, an estimated average of 6.5 are fakes.
  • Our corporate taxes are lower (PricewaterhouseCoopers ranks Canada 8th out of 185 countries for its advantageous corporate tax structure while the U.S. is 69th).
  • We embrace transit: Seven of the 10 North American cities with the most people taking transit to work are in Canada.
  • We get more paid holidays: America has no mandated paid holidays or vacation time, so 23 per cent of U.S. workers get no paid time off, compared to Canadian workers who get at least two weeks and nine paid public holidays.
  • More women work here: For most of the past 40 years more American women have been in the labour market than in Canada, but after 2000 that changed—62 per cent of Canadian women are in the labour market, compared to 57 per cent in the U.S.
  • More of our immigrants strike it rich: In both the U.S. and Canada the majority of millionaires are self-made, but a larger number in Canada are immigrants, according to a BMO study—in Canada nearly half of millionaires are immigrants or second-generation residents, compared to just one-third in America.